8 Scenes From “Who Wants Roger Rabbit Skin?” That Would Be Considered Unacceptable Today.

There are films which, in one way or another, marked our childhood and our adolescence. No matter what era we grew up in, we all remember with nostalgia and amusement the characters, jokes, scenes, and songs that have been with us for years, becoming true symbols. And, even though we once thought they were absolutely harmless and age-appropriate, looking at them again and thinking about them after years can show us new and surprising aspects.

Think, for example, of Who Wants Roger Rabbit ?. Anyone who has seen this film directed by Robert Zemeckis will probably remember it first as a film “for children”, or at most for teenagers. And yet, this masterpiece is anything but a classic film for little ones. The reason? Some scenes and themes that today would certainly not be suitable for everyone. If you don’t remember, we’ll refresh your memory..

#1

image credit: Who Framed Roger Rabbit – Buena Vista Pictures Distribution

Would you ever have thought that in a children’s film there might appear themes such as alcoholism, plots in a perfect, gloomy noir style, and not so veiled references to passion? If the answer is no, Who Wants Roger Rabbit is not the right movie to show your kids unless you give them a few warnings about what they’re about to see first.

Above we’ve selected a photo from the scene where Judge Morton (Crystopher Lloyd) is seen getting crushed by a scroll as he screams in a rather dramatic way.

#2

image credit: Who Framed Roger Rabbit – Buena Vista Pictures Distribution

Admittedly, right after, there is a turnaround in the perfect “cartoon” style, but it’s certainly a pretty intense moment, as the antagonist’s eyes come out and turn into daggers.

#3

image credit: Who Framed Roger Rabbit – Buena Vista Pictures Distribution

Do you remember the scene from the horribly executed little cartoon shoe by the terrible judge? Even here we are at levels that can hardly be called “for all”. The film indeed requires us to watch an innocent cartoon shoe being submerged in a pot containing brine, a lethal mixture of turpentine, acetone, and benzene. The only way – according to what the character in the film explains – to eliminate a cartoon for good. Rather macabre, isn’t it?

#4

image credit: Who Framed Roger Rabbit – Buena Vista Pictures Distribution

Another rather sinister passage from the film is also tied to Morton and occurs when this one, at the end of a suspenseful sequence (and in which, incidentally, we see Roger and Jessica Rabbit attached to each other). another risking a horrible end), eventually dissolves into the anti-cartoon mixture.

#5

image credit: Who Framed Roger Rabbit – Buena Vista Pictures Distribution

Fear, screaming and an atmosphere that is anything but “relaxed” form the heart of the story. It is no coincidence that these sequences are among the most terrifying ever seen in a “children’s” film .

#6

image credit: Who Framed Roger Rabbit – Buena Vista Pictures Distribution

Daffy Duck and Donald Duck , during their duel on the piano, do not go dead hand either. Not only do they hit each other, but how can you forget the cannonball that the Disney character gives to the character of Looney Toones to finish off his antagonist?

#7

image credit: Who Framed Roger Rabbit – Buena Vista Pictures Distribution

A rather violent gesture , during which the “nice” Donald is even seen pushing a pair of devil horns.

#8

image credit: Who Framed Roger Rabbit – Buena Vista Pictures Distribution

What about Baby Herman? A rather vulgar baby who constantly smokes a cigar, we do not see it every day in films of this kind … and we certainly would not see him again today! There is also no shortage of references and jokes about smoking, alcoholism, themes, and rather pungent situations throughout the film.

In short: we could continue to analyze this cult film as one that is definitely not aimed at children. The themes and certain scenes could have caused nightmares for very young children who saw it for the first time! It is certainly curious to look at it from this angle, just as it is incredible to think that, in the “distant” 1988, one dared without a doubt much more than today! Did you want to see him again?

join our facebook group
Show More
Back to top button
error:

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker